Posts categorized: Ethical consumption

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The High Cost of High Fashion

Campaigns against “fast fashion” scapegoat working-class consumers while doing little to improve the conditions of garment workers. Source: Jacobin

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Why eating vegetarian may not be the most ethical diet

Though meat consumption in Canada has declined or plateaued in the past four decades — per capita red meat went down nearly 40 per cent between 1980 and 2015, according to government statistics — along with the rise of “plant-based” diets and Meatless Mondays, it’s estimated only 4 per cent of Canadians do not eat… Read more »

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Sustainable Business Models Can Lead To Economic Growth

Sustainable business models have a major role to play in economic growth. They could unlock economic opportunities worth up to $12 trillion and increase employment by up to 380 million jobs by 2030, as a report by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission (BSDC) reveals. Source: Just Means

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The Scary Thing About GMO That Nobody’s Talking About

It’s important to understand that GMOs probably aren’t going to make you grow a giant tumor out of your neck. Your son isn’t going to wind up with a rabbit vagina in the crook of his elbow. Nobody is sticking needles in your peppers. Source: Newco Shift

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In Defense of Ethical Omnivorism

Humans have biologically evolved and thrived as omnivores, mixing both the attributes of properly prepared plant foods and those of wild or pasture-raised meats, milk from cows that ate grass and fish that swam freely. Source: Daily Nexus

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Veganism Comes At a Price

As knowledge about the meat industry and the environmental impacts of animal product consumption have seeped into the mainstream through social media and documentaries like “Cowspiracy” and “Forks Over Knives,” people in the United States are increasingly switching to a vegan or vegetarian diet. Source: New School Free Press

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The eco guide to good plastic

If we carry on creating and consuming plastic as we are now, by 2050 there will more pieces of plastic in the ocean than there are fish. It seems overwhelming. Almost every piece of plastic ever produced that has not been burned (burning causes toxic emissions), still exists. Source: The Guardian