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Ethical arguments won’t end factory farming. Technology might

Bruce Friedrich is the Executive Director of The Good Food Institute in Washington, DC, an organization that partners with scientists, investors, and entrepreneurs to create cleaner and safer food products. The institute has a very specific aim: identify and promote market-based alternatives to our current food production system, which is dirty, inefficient, and unsustainable. Source: Vox

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Researchers survey ‘ethical consumerism’ views

Research at Purdue University draws a connection between lifestyles choices and demographics of consumers and how they view not only their own social responsibility in their buying decisions but also that of corporations. Source: Phys.Org

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The Place of Food in Caring for the Self and Others

In 1825 the French gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin declared, “Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are.” By this he seemed to mean that he could tell something about a person’s character and class by what they eat. Source: ABC Australia

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Why You Should Be Shopping Fair Trade

If the droves of ecologically sourced, direct-to-consumer start-ups that have launched over the past few years are any indication, customers are becoming both savvier and more discerning about where their products come from. Source: Architectural Digest

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Do the right thing: how brands are embracing humane capitalism

To date, many “marketing for good” campaigns fail to answer two fundamental questions: “How does this involve the consumer?” and the perennial marketing favourite: “What’s in it for me?” A significant cultural change is afoot and, five years from now, the worst extremes of certain industrial practices, such as battery farming, may seem like a horrific relic of a bygone age. Source: Campaign Magazine

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The limit of labels: ethical food is more than consumer choice

Over the past hundred years, industrial agriculture and the globalised food system have produced cheaper, longer lasting and more diverse food items. We can now enjoy tropical fruits in winter, purchase whole chickens at the price of a cup of coffee, and eat fresh bread long after it was baked. Source: The Conversation

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Making Human Hamburgers: Bioethics and the Yuck Factor

Originally termed by Dr. Arthur Caplan, the “yuck factor” was popularized by Dr. Leon Kass in 1997 when he described his position against cloning human beings. Dr. Kass defined the bioethical “yuck factor” as an intuitive response rather than a reasoned, ethical or moral violation by a new technology. Source: Scientific American